dirty.knees

In preparation for yesterday’s message at Thrive Church, my heart has been in some serious “exploration” mode with God. Many of you know that I am a “tentmaker,” pastoring a church and holding a career as an architectural designer. So, it sort of goes without saying that I don’t mind working hard. But, I have to admit that I sometimes struggle with a calling to be a pastor and having to endure this season of splitting my time between the calling and a career.

Luckily, on many occasions, I’ve been privileged to see God use me to glorify Him in my “secular” arena. But, I still sometimes struggle with this season of ministry.

Yesterday, while preaching about the Garden of Eden (you can listen if you want), God spoke to me strongly about my struggle. Just as God placed Adam in the Garden of Eden, to work it and care for it (Genesis 2:5) – even though he didn’t really need a gardener – he placed me in the “garden” of my secular work. And just like for Adam, the work is not really the important thing, although it must be done. The important thing is the opportunity God has given me, through the work, to be a part of what he is doing to rescue the word – one garden at a time.

So, I’ll get my knees dirty, doing the work, because I want to be right where God wants me, being a part of His thing.

Are you struggling with the “garden” where God put you?

8 thoughts on “dirty.knees”

  1. Wow….I got here from Jaycee’s tweet. I must say, this was one of the best things I read today.

    “And just like for Adam, the work is not really the important thing, although it must be done.”

    God has planted me in a garden where I’m still trying to figure out why and find my way around all the trees and stumps but reading this has reminded me about what’s really important….

    Thanks for sharing

  2. dang, lost a good comment :-/ hit submit and it disappeared!

    We’re all volunteer at Real Church, excet our lead pastor, so we’ve all had the whole day-job crisis before. But, God uses me at work to reach out to people in a way I’d never be able to without being an engineer. AND, being an engineer brings a unique perspective to the church world that I think has been really valuable.

    1. yep I totally get that – I’ve been told that in this economy they really appreciate that I am working outside the church instead of asking the people to support a salary on tip of the stuff we want to do for people

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